Catch-Up Mini-Reviews

Captain Britain and MI:13 #15

Britain

Thus ends one of Marvel’s strongest ongoing books.  Cornell and Kirk wind down their title with the massive “Vampire State” arc that should’ve been cheesy as hell but ended up being gripping, exciting and just downright fun.  The issue is packed with excellently written and drawn action set-pieces that build off of everything that’s come before to give the issue the emotional closure it needed without sacrificing the excitement.  Top quality work.

Grade: B+

Runaways #12

Runaway

Immonen still hasn’t brought the energy of her absolutely fantastic Patsy Walker: Hellcat mini to the title, but her second issue shows a small amount of improvement over the first.  Pichelli’s art renders everyone and everything in the title improbably pretty, if overly cartoonish, but she handles the issue’s dramatic moments quite well.  Nothing spectacular yet, but more than good enough to keep giving it a shot.

Grade: B-

Final Crisis Aftermath: Ink #3

Ink3

Ink continues to be the surprise of the Final Crisis Aftermath titles for me as it uses the conventions of the gritty crime drama to tell the story of a supervillain seeking redemption.  Wallace and Fiorentino make the tale a little more complicated than it needs to be by having Richards’ tattoos come to life, but the metaphor is apt: escaping a life of crime is already hard without having those closest to you trying to drag you back into it.  

Grade: B

– Cal Cleary

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Captain Britain and MI:13 #14

Runaways #11

Final Crisis Aftermath: Ink #2

Final Crisis Aftermath: Ink #1

Review: Captain Britain and MI:13 #14

Captain Britain

Ah, good old Captain Britain and MI:13.  No matter what else is going wrong in the Marvel Universe, you’ll always be here to make it better, won’t you?  Well, unfortunately not – the book only has a short while left to live.  So, the question becomes: can Paul Cornell and co. give us a satisfying send-off to one of Marvel’s strongest titles?

This arc, titled “Vampire State” suggests that they can.  Dracula has been breeding an army of vampires on the moon and allying himself with all manner of supernatural menace before he begins to make his final move – conquering Britain in the name of his vampire army.  Despite the seemingly inherent camp in the premise, Cornell plays it straight and it pays off.  Rather than coming off as a post-ironic dig at a more innocent age, the issue suggests why the semi-realistic grim ‘n grit so often feels terribly false – this isn’t our world.  It’s one infinitely more scary, and infinitely more wonderful, and we see a little bit of both aspects in this issue.

After a quick turnaround from the seemingly doomed ending of last issue, we learn that our heroes at MI:13 have managed to pull one over on Dracula and buy themselves some time to fight back.  They use that time well, and Cornell brings us an action-packed issue with crisp, excellent art from Syaf and Kirk and and a parting ‘gift’ from Doctor Doom that sets up the issue to come and reminds us all why the good Doctor can be such an effective villain.

Captain Britain and MI:13 is far from flawless, but even at its worst, its an exciting book with solid characterization and fun, clever arcs – and this issue is far from the book’s worst.

Grade: B+

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