Batmonth!: The Dark Knight Rises

The Dark Knight Rises?” I hear you ask quietly, a little confused and scared that you have somehow overlooked a classic Batman story, that your geek cred has been challenged.  “What, good sir, is this?” you would ask in that ceaselessly polite way you only ever see on the Internet.

Christopher Nolan, who recently finally confirmed that he would be directing the third Batman film and that it would be his last, spoke today with the L.A. Times.  Nolan is notoriously loathe to drop too many hints about his movies too far in advance, but he did drop a few hints in the article (which I would be more than willing to bet all of you have already left this page to go read).

First and foremost: the title.  Nolan’s third and final Batman movie will be called The Dark Knight Rises.  Other confirmations?  The film will NOT be shot in 3D (thank goodness, says I), the villain will NOT be the Riddler or Mr. Freeze, and Nolan will NOT tell you what you want to know.

Anyway, hop on over to the LA Times to read the story and start getting excited.  Only, uh, two more years until the movie hits!

Let the hype machine begin!

– Cal Cleary

Batmonth!: One Shot 7: Detective Comics #826

Twenty-two pages fills up fast.  There’s no denying that.  Action sequences often eat up huge chunks of a book, and you can only fit so much dialogue on the page before it becomes cluttered, not to mention how much of the probably excellent art you’ll be covering up by doing so.  So, understandably, most writers will have their stories run in arcs, often using well over 100 pages to let it unfold.  It’s not hard to see why, but the tendency to keep expanding the story is part of what makes it so rewarding when you come across a single issue that manages to not only exemplify what it is you so love about that particular book, or even comics in general, but that manages to do so with an impressive economy of storytelling.  One Shot is meant to take a close look at why those issues work as well as they do, the way they do.

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Batmonth!: Batman: Year One

Fun fact: before Frank Miller apparently went bat-shit insane and became more famous for things like this or this, he was THE iconic Batman writer.  Famous for saving the character from the annals of bad camp, Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns was a ground-breaking piece in 1986, and he followed it up only a year later with an in-continuity Batman tale that was, if not groundbreaking, at least trend-setting.  Batman: Year One was originally published in four issues of Batman in 1987, and it’s been republished in multiple collections ever since, a definitive origin story for DC’s most popular hero.

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Batmonth!: One Shot 6: The Batman Chronicles #16

Twenty-two pages fills up fast.  There’s no denying that.  Action sequences often eat up huge chunks of a book, and you can only fit so much dialogue on the page before it becomes cluttered, not to mention how much of the probably excellent art you’ll be covering up by doing so.  So, understandably, most writers will have their stories run in arcs, often using well over 100 pages to let it unfold.  It’s not hard to see why, but the tendency to keep expanding the story is part of what makes it so rewarding when you come across a single issue that manages to not only exemplify what it is you so love about that particular book, or even comics in general, but that manages to do so with an impressive economy of storytelling.  One Shot is meant to take a close look at why those issues work as well as they do, the way they do.

Continue reading

Batmonth!

Welcome, loyal reader, to Batmonth! here at read/RANT!, where we love exclamation points and hate the things you like.  Given that, theoretically at least, Bruce Wayne will be returning to our time near the end of October in Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne #6 (we are well aware that, given Morrison’s schedule, it will actually probably be more like January), we thought it’d be a good opportunity to look back at a few of Batman’s most famous stories.  After all, how often does a major icon like Batman ‘die’ in a highly publicized event comic only to come back a year later in an equally highly publicized event?  … don’t answer that.

We’ll be writing about everything from Batman: Year One to the 1960’s Adam West TV show, alongside our normal material, looking back at all the material that’s helped shape the Dark Knight & Co. into the icons they are today.  Hopefully, you’ll enjoy reading about it as much as we enjoy writing about it!

Keep an eye out – first articles will be going up this weekend!