Review: H’el on Earth

Supe_Family

Yet again, I got reeled into a cross over event, this time being H’el On Earth involving Superboy, Supergirl, and Superman comics.  While Superman #13 leads up to this event, the real crossover begins with the 14 issues.  And for any wondering about order to read them: Superboy, Supergirl, Superman.  Really, Superboy peaked my interest in it, and I’ve been interested how Lobdell’s Superman would be.  Have to say so far I’m not disappointed, and that some spoilers may lie ahead.

Continue reading

This Week In Comics: 6/6/2012

This week in comics, DC’s attempt to cash-in on Watchmen 25 years too late (and a few years too late for the film) begins with Before Watchmen: Minutemen, Boom! launches some a pair of new ongoings, and Morrison kills Clark Kent, that bastard!

Swamp Thing #10 wins this week’s award for Most Misleading Cover, ignoring the book’s creepy imagery and muted colors for a bland-looking fight that doesn’t actually happen. It also wins the award for Molestiest Cover, unfortunately.

Continue reading

Review: Action Comics #6

Action Comics #1 gave us rowdy, unruly teenage Superman, a crusader for Truth, Justice and the American Way who hadn’t yet managed to learn how to temper his passions with diplomacy.  And it was fascinating.  Six issues into the series, and Morrison and his creative team are still finding new ways to look at the younger Superman, whether its in the simple, touching back-up feature by Sholly Fisch or in the main adventure, which finds us following an older, wiser Superman as he faces a threat to his past selves.   And while neither story is perfect in this particularly-weak issue of Action Comics, I still find myself enjoying and even recommending t he book for its shameless sense of fun and the rock-solid grasp it has of its main character.

Continue reading

Review: Action Comics #3

Action Comics #3, cover by Morales & Anderson

Superman is an old character, and one that some people have often had trouble relating to.  Seen as the ultimate boy scout, as a man in a stable marriage who works a 9-to-5 job, teens in particular often reject him.  And while other writers have played up Superman’s genuine outsider status (most brilliantly in recent years, Kurt Busiek in the fantastic and melancholy Superman: Secret Identity), few have aligned it so thoroughly with the spirit of teenage rebellion than Grant Morrison is doing in Action Comics right now.  I don’t know if the audience will bite, but Morrison has envisioned a thoroughly youthful Superman, a self-righteous warrior for truth with a black-and-white view of right and wrong and the power to try and enforce change.   But like we all discover eventually, change is really, really, really, really hard – even for Superman – and pushing against the status quo is a great way to make enemies.

Continue reading

DCnU Timeline v2.1 (+ rant)

Version 2.1 is here!  Why 2.1?  Well this is basically version 2 but with a rant about Crisis events due to a recent message from Didio countering an older interview of Harras and Berganza.

Continue reading

Review: Action Comics #2

Action Comics #2 (cover by Ethan Van Sciver)

Once of the most difficult things to accept about this relaunch is the same problem I had (and, in part, still have) with Marvel’s Ultimate Universe: why reboot things if you’re just going to keep telling the same story?  Particularly in the beginning of Ultimate Spider-Man, each arc introduced and discarded a classic Spider-Man villain – where’s the fun in that?  But, after going on a run through the first five or six arcs, I started to get it.  It was a chance to revamp and update classic characters for a new audience, and slowly slide things in a direction we never would have predicted.  Rather than jumping in blind with ideas that will be (inevitably) compared to their classic counterparts, the Ultimate Universe started slow and built up a following all its own, a rhythm unique to itself.

Continue reading

Review: Superman #1

Superman #1

Growing up, I was never much of a comic book reader.  I didn’t grow up with Superman, didn’t grow up loving the Man of Steel, and so when I finally did start reading comics late in high school, and get really interested in comics in college, I never understood the adulation he got, his place in the pantheon of All-Time Pop Culture Greats.  I thought he was boring.  Who cares about an hero who can’t get hurt?  Who can do everything?

Continue reading

Retrospective: Teen Titans vol 3 (part 7)

Looking into issue 50-54.  Issue 50 is a collaboration between McKeever, Johns, Wolfman, and Dezago.  This is also Johns’ last work on Teen Titans and after this issue, McKeever takes over by himself for a while.

Continue reading

Retrospective: Teen Titans vol 3 (part 3)


I’m continuing my Retrospective for the Teen Titans with the Teens Titans/Legion of Superheroes crossover and issues 16-19 (collected in trade as The Future is Now).  Handling a lot with these issues, so I’ll try to keep it from being too long.  I do want to state though that these issues are some of my favorites of this Teen Titans group and Johns is joined by writer Mark Waid for the Legion cross over.

Continue reading

Retrospective: Teen Titans vol 3 (part 1)

I’m a fan of the Teen Titans, especially the latest incarnation that went from 2003-2011 and as this relaunch makes it seem their entire history may be erased, I wanted to give them a farewell starting with issues 1-7 (also collected in trade form as “A Kid’s Game” or the soon to be released Teen Titans Omnibus 1).  Like usual, beware of spoilers.

Continue reading

DCnU Timeline v1

So DC gave us a “relaunch” where bits are the same, others erased, and the general timeline crunched down due to de-aging many (but not all) of the characters.  Due to this I at least am very confused on how everything fits in.  So with the help of the other bloggers, I’ve decided to piece together a timeline.

Continue reading

NewU Reviews: Week One of the DC Relaunch

Action Comics #1

One week in, and I have to say: I’m impressed.  It’s not that all of the books are winners. They aren’t.  There’s a fair bit of mediocrity here.  But it’s the sort of mediocrity that SELLS.  It’s the kind many people like.  While I found the Batbooks lacking the ambition of Morrison’s run or the strong characterization and storytelling of Snyder’s run, the fact is that all of them are solid executions on a formula that works.  Outside of maybe Hawk and Dove (the only book I put down without having a solid grasp on what it wanted to do or say), every book on here stands a fair chance of finding a loyal audience – and what’s more, there’s an awful lot of ambition on display.

But what has really impressed me is the variety of stories on display.  Whether it’s the way Morrison and Morales have shaken up the way Superman is ‘supposed to’ look, act and sound, the way Jeff Lemire and Scott Snyder are effortlessly blending superheroes with horror or the way Ivan Brandon gives war a terrifying new dimension in a world full of superhumans, the New DCU seems to have something to offer everyone! Continue reading

One Shot 9: All-Star Superman #10

Just about every issue of Morrison’s All-Star Superman would probably be a good fit for this column.  With the exception of the Bizarro Earth two-parter and the two issue conclusion, every issue could stand alone as a fantastic single serving Superman story.  There are two stories in the book’s 12-issue run, however, that deserve special attention in this regard: “Neverending” and “Funeral in Smallville”.  For now, I’ll be focusing on All-Star Superman #10, “Neverending”, but believe me, I’ll come back for the other.

Continue reading